Curiosity Delivers.

Film and TV

Film and TV

Cinema Politica shines light on the margins

Cinema Politica is a nonprofit network that collects and screens independent documentary films. Its weekly screenings embody the network’s slogan, “screening truth to power,” with films that show solidarity with oppressed voices who often go unheard in mainstream media. The McGill Tribune looks at two of their most recent films, examining stories not often told. Memories of… Keep Reading

The most egregious snubs of the 2018 Oscars

The Academy Awards are awful. This is not up for dispute. They’re trying to get better—this year’s nominees present a definitively more inclusive list than in years past—but at its heart, the event is a self-congratulatory, out of touch, typically-discriminatory money grab that almost always awards the wrong thing. Nevertheless, it will inevitably elicit coverage… Keep Reading

Film and TV

Sam Rockwell shines in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Writer-director Martin McDonagh’s (In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths) world is inhabited by broken souls; well-intentioned but flawed people who hurt the ones they love because they have not found any other way to cope. Pain passes between individuals in an endless cycle of violence, and we watch as it grows, infects, and destroys everything in its… Keep Reading

Film and TV

On Armie Hammer’s shoes in Call Me By Your Name

Shoes don’t often scream your name from across a crowded room. Unlike the peacockish hat, the ostentatious bifocal, or the presumptuous earring, the humble shoe does not boisterously salute you at eye-level. Often concealed, or at least partially so, by a brashly uncuffed pant leg, shoes maintain a measured distance from gaudy exhibition. Enter into… Keep Reading

Film and TV

Phantom Thread finds hilarity in toxicity

Don’t be deceived by its trailers: Phantom Thread, the new Paul Thomas Anderson (Inherent Vice, Boogie Nights) film, is possibly the funniest thing he’s made yet. It’s also one of the most impeccably-crafted movies of 2017. Daniel Day-Lewis stars as Reynolds Woodcock in what he claims will be his last role before retirement. Woodcock is… Keep Reading

Film and TV

Thirty years of queer art and activism at image+nation

Thirty years ago, Canada’s first LGBTQ film festival held its inaugural screening. Today, the image+nation festival continues to share queer cinema with Montreal’s wider community, supporting the producers and artists who create these spellbinding stories. Bringing all of this together is no easy task. Programming director Katharine Setzer and her team scour other film festivals… Keep Reading

Film and TV

Short guides to active viewership and listening

Active Viewership Throw your cellphone, food, and “friend” out the window Rather than splitting your time between different distractions, do one thing at a time! Ask “Why?” Take for granted that filmmakers know what they are doing, and that all things happen for a reason. Questioning every artistic decision will force you to dig deeper… Keep Reading

Film and TV

Cielo: Alison McAlpine’s conversation with the sky

Among the 142 films featured at the latest Montréal International Documentary Festival (Nov. 9 – 19), one of the most memorable was Cielo, the first feature film by Canadian director Alison McAlpine. Set in the Chilean Atacama Desert, Cielo is an exploration of the night sky’s hold over the people who live in the driest desert… Keep Reading

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