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Bill 151 exposes gaps in McGill Policy Against Sexual Violence

At the Nov. 1 sitting of the National Assembly of Québec, Minister for Higher Education Hélène David introduced Bill 151, which aims to prevent and fight sexual violence in higher education institutions. The bill would require all universities in the province to develop a policy against sexual violence that is separate from its other policies… Keep Reading

quebec

“Bonjour-Hi:” The value of multiculturalism

Valérie Plante, Montréal’s new mayor, has openly supported providing services to citizens in the language that they are most comfortable with, be that English or French. Plante recently proposed promoting bilingualism in the Société de Transport de Montréal (STM) by providing emergency messages in multiple languages. However, the current provincial government continues to resist bilingualism.… Keep Reading

quebec

McGill’s sexual violence policy lacking on professor-student relationships

Quebec’s proposed Bill 151 requires all postsecondary schools to have a campus sexual violence policy by September 2019. Among other things, the bill stipulates that an acceptable policy must provide a clear code of conduct on relationships between faculty members and students. In Fall 2016, McGill introduced a Policy against Sexual Violence (SVP), which applies to… Keep Reading

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Quebec’s new weed laws are prudently vigilant

Quebec's proposed legislation regarding the regulation of marijuana—set to be legalized federally on July 1, 2018—will likely be the harshest in the country, amassing much criticism since it was tabled on Nov. 16. On one side, the Quebec Liberal Party has come under attack from news sites, such as Vice, and marijuana activists for being too… Keep Reading

quebec

McGill Faculty of Law weighs in on Bill 62

On Nov. 8, the McGill Muslim Law Students’ Association (MLSA) hosted a panel discussion at which Law Professors Colleen Sheppard, Mark Walters, and Johanne Poirier weighed in on the constitutionality of Bill 62. Panelists offered different perspectives on the legislation—which the National Assembly of Quebec passed three weeks prior—to discuss its potential infringement upon religious… Keep Reading

quebec

A difficult transition into the adult care of chronic conditions

Anyone who has ever been a first year in university can remember how overwhelming it can be at times: Navigating campus, taking on large course loads, making new friends, and perhaps even living away from home. Eighteen-year-old freshmen who live with a chronic illness, like type 1 diabetes, face the struggles that come with taking… Keep Reading

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McGill students protest passage of Bill 62

The National Assembly of Québec passed Bill 62 on Oct. 18 by a vote of 66 to 51, mandating that all recipients of government services, as well as the officials providing them, keep their faces uncovered during public exchanges. The legislation, introduced by Minister of Justice Stephanie Vallée in 2015, applies to patients receiving care… Keep Reading

quebec

McGill must take a stand against Bill 62

Bill 62 is a xenophobic piece of legislation that is not reflective of the multicultural values upheld at McGill. The bill, passed by the provincial government on Oct. 18, prohibits citizens from covering their faces while giving and using public services. Justified under the guise of religious neutrality and security, Bill 62 is anything but… Keep Reading

quebec

Board of Governors convene for the first meeting of the year

The Board of Governors (BoG) held its first meeting of the 2017-2018 term on Oct. 5, which highlighted the appointment of McGill alumna Julie Payette to the office of Governor General of Canada, McGill’s response to the legalization of cannabis, recent progress made by the Task Force on Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Education, and the… Keep Reading

quebec

Dear Quebec, give Jagmeet Singh a fair shot

The New Democratic Party (NDP) has been in hibernation since the last federal election. It shed several pounds in Parliament—from 103 to 44 seats after the 2015 election—and ran its it’s base’s enthusiasm enthusiasm dry, leaving a skeleton of good policy remaining but little charisma. In this weak position, the NDP took its biggest gamble… Keep Reading

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