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politics

Religious neutrality isn't neutral
politics

Religious neutrality isn’t neutral

On Oct. 1, Quebec elected 74 members of the Coalition Avenir du Québec (CAQ) to the National Assembly, giving the party a majority mandate. The CAQ campaigned on a platform of reducing immigration, restructuring government institutions, and maintaining ‘religious neutrality.’ Discussions about religious neutrality are not new in Quebec: In 2013, the Parti Québécois government… Keep Reading

politics

Toward a more democratically engaged student body

In six days, universities across the province—McGill included—will be cancelling classes for Quebec’s  provincial election day. Many students may already be making plans to enjoy the cool fall weather or catch up on the classes they missed during add/drop. Considerably fewer may be actively planning to vote. But, enjoying the long weekend and fulfilling civic… Keep Reading

politics

Université de Montréal kicks off the provincial election

In advance of the upcoming Quebec provincial election, Parti Québécois (PQ) leader Jean-François Lisée spoke about about public transportation, unpaid internships, and the role of science in society at the Université de Montréal’s (UdeM) Ernest-Cormier amphitheatre on Sep. 11. The event was organized by the Fédération des associations étudiantes du campus de l’Université de Montréal… Keep Reading

politics

Journalism still matters

Returning home for reading week often comes with the usual barrage of concern from my family over my choice to pursue journalism as a career. “Journalism is a dying field,” my family members say. “Anybody with a blog can be a journalist.” Yet, I could scarcely go a day without one of my friends or… Keep Reading

politics

Word on the Y: What are your headline predictions for 2018?

As one of the most eventful years for North American politics in recent history, 2017 offered a slew of surprising and thought-provoking news stories. With the new year upon us, there are endless possibilities for what this year’s major political headlines will be. To get students’ thoughts the on the matter, The McGill Tribune trekked out… Keep Reading

politics

After the march: Political parties deliver lasting change

On Saturday, Jan. 20, hundreds of Montrealers gathered at Place des Arts to march in support of women’s rights. While demonstrations of popular disapproval of U.S. President Donald Trump might give individuals worldwide some hope that human decency remains in society, they will not evict him from office. This is not to say that acts… Keep Reading

politics

How soap sparked controversy: Political ads must be handled with care

Advertisements that incorporate social and political commentary when selling a product have become increasingly popular in recent years. This has also lead to an increase in controversy. Recent advertisements such as the infamous Kendall Jenner Pepsi flop, in which Jenner uses a can of Pepsi to resolve a protest, and the more recent Dove attempt at diversity,… Keep Reading

politics

Don’t tell celebrities to “stay out of politics”

Many actors and actresses have recently been criticized for being too political in award acceptance speeches. Some celebrities explicitly avoid sharing their political opinions so as not to alienate portions of their fan base. As Mark Wahlberg said, “Both Republicans and Democrats buy movie tickets.” However, all democratic citizens have the right to participate in… Keep Reading

politics

The allegory of Trump in Canada

As an American student at McGill, many of the things I’ve heard some Canadians say about the United States—particularly its politics—have been false, absurd, and, on occasion, hypocritical. More concerning, however, is the apparent failure of many Canadians to understand American politics and learn from our mistakes. In my experience, Canadians distance themselves from the… Keep Reading

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