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Dial M For Murder
Players Theatre

Players’ Theatre makes a killing with Dial M for Murder

Dial M For Murder, written by Frederick Knott and directed by Ali Aasim, is a sensational start to the Players’ Theatre’s 2015-2016 season. Filled with moments of suspense and meaningful dialogue, the show keeps the audience guessing right until the final moment. Set in New York City during the 1950’s, Dial M For Murder opens… Keep Reading

Players Theatre

Peer Review: Bring Your Own Juice

It is no surprise that McGill, a school of academia and research, is reputable for its political groups, newspapers, and environmental activism. Yet, comedy often fades into the background almost unnoticed. How ironic is it that in Montreal, a city that’s home to the Just for Laughs headquarters and festival, the comedy scene is underrepresented… Keep Reading

Players Theatre

Peer Review: Players’ Theatre Round Dance

  When watching student productions, it’s easy to ignore the behind-the-scenes work that goes into creating a single show. From lighting and set design to casting and directing, every element of these productions is under the control of individual students. Off stage,  many of these same players simultaneously spend their time enrolled in class, working… Keep Reading

Players Theatre

Uneven script limits Players’ production’s promising potential

  The Creation of the World and Other Business is a deep cut of Arthur Miller’s work. The self-serious American playwright tried his hand at comedy, and what followed was nothing if not memorable and confusing. In fact, director Kirsten Kephalas admits that the play is “one of the worst comedies [she had] ever read.”… Keep Reading

Players Theatre

Theatre Review: Oh, What a Lovely War!

It’s commonly said that “comedy is tragedy plus time,” and few shows can capture that saying in as much of a literal sense as Oh, What a Lovely War! does. Originally created in 1963—well after the dust had settled on the horrors of both world wars—the production was intended to be an ironic critique of… Keep Reading

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