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Inclusive hiring requires more than a quota

Dalhousie University has recently come under fire for limiting its search for a new vice-provost student affairs to “racially visible persons and Aboriginal peoples,” in an effort to boost minority faculty representation. Critics have condemned the policy as discriminatory against white people, and argue that hiring based on race, rather than merit, is misguided. While Dalhousie’s… Keep Reading

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Evaluating gendered bias in course evaluations

‘Tis the season—for course evaluations. At McGill, the online form asks students to effectively grade their professors, by identifying the degree to which they agree with statements such as, “Overall, this instructor is an excellent teacher.” These data are then made available to all McGill students, but open-ended feedback is reserved for professors. In Fall… Keep Reading

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Hiring discrimination exists—it’s time for universities to acknowledge it

In her Nov. 4 column in The Globe and Mail, Margaret Wente denounced the decision of Universities Canada, a national university lobbying group, to release the demographic data for each university faculty in a national database. Her argument is that universities have come to prioritize inclusivity over performance; hiring staff, for instance, has supposedly become… Keep Reading

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WIIS holds first public event on women in peacekeeping

The McGill chapter of Women in International Security (WIIS) held its first public event, “Women in Peacekeeping,” on Oct. 11, which called for increasing the participation of women in the United Nations’ (UN) peacekeeping forces. The talk was hosted by WIIS executive director,  Cassandra Steer, who has worked with McGill both within the Faculty of… Keep Reading

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STEMM Diversity @ McGill launches at Redpath Museum

Nearly a year after its inception, the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Medicine (STEMM) Diversity @ McGill initiative, which aims to promote diversity in STEMM fields, launched an exhibition under the same name at the Redpath Museum on Oct. 11. The exhibit, which is still growing, features interviews with women and minorities in STEMM at McGill.… Keep Reading

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It’s not just humans who can be biased

The tech industry has long been a demographically homogeneous place, and there has been a lot of conversation about how to make the industry more inclusive for people who don’t fit the stereotype of the Silicon Valley tech bro. However, making the products themselves more inclusive hasn't received as much public attention. In part, this can… Keep Reading

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Campus Spotlight: Social Equity and Diversity Education Office

The Social Equity and Diversity Education (SEDE) Office at McGill provides equity education across campus and beyond. Through equity training sessions, workshops, and advising services for students and faculty members, SEDE aims to serve the needs of marginalized voices on campus. Founded in 2005 by Associate Director Veronica Amberg, SEDE once existed solely within the… Keep Reading

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Pop Rhetoric: Harry Potter and the burden of diversity

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has been in the news regularly for her steadfast refusal to let her series fade from public consciousness. These efforts range from small pieces uploaded to the website, pottermore.com, to the addition of an entirely new instalment in the form of a play script. In the past few weeks, she has… Keep Reading

diversity

Pop Rhetoric: The small screen reaches a wider audience

Television has long been regarded as film’s more annoying, less accomplished younger sibling. Sound bytes like 'made for T.V. movie' and 'multi-camera sitcom' continue to haunt audiences’ psyches, evoking nightmares of outrageous laugh tracks and over-dramatic soap opera acting.  For decades, critics considered film the real art form—a medium that actually allowed its stories and characters nuance… Keep Reading

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Diversity unravelled

Growing up, I always knew I was different. As a Bangladeshi citizen who was born in Indonesia, I was atypical. As someone who attended the same international school for 11 years—where international schools are notorious for the amount of year to year turnover they see in their student bodies—I wasn’t /normal/. In many ways, that… Keep Reading

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