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Research Briefs—March 31, 2015

  A visual dictionary Recent research published in The Journal of Neuroscience by researchers from Georgetown University has preseanted the mechanism underlying how humans read. The researchers found that instead of breaking down words into sounds and meanings, our brains visually imagine the word first. The collaboration of scientists conducting this study believe a small… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Mar. 10, 2015

  Working out boosts grey matter A recent study of adult twins has shown that an exercise routine can do more than just burn fat. Researchers from the University of Jyväskylä in Finland analyzed data from 10 pairs of adult male twins who had grown up playing the same sports, but in recent years had… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Feb. 24, 2015

Giving the finger The notion that there exists a correlation between the length of a person’s finger and their amicability may seem strange. However, researchers from McGill University are showing exactly that—but only in men. Scientists, by comparing the length of the index second finger (2D) to the fourth finger (4D), have created a reproducible… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Feb. 17, 2015

  #engaged Charting into unprecedented territory, relationships are now using digital platforms to display signs of love and appreciation. A study from Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Interactive Computing will be presented at California’s iConference in March. Entitled She Said Yes! Liminality and Engagement Announcements on Twitter, the study focused on Twitter feeds following… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Jan. 27, 2015

Is being bilingual better? A 2011 census of Canada revealed Montreal to have the highest rate of bilinguals in the country. While this figure may not come as a surprise to many, it does make Montreal the ideal candidate for demonstrating the ‘bilingual advantage.’   Evidence has shown that raising a child in a multilingual… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Nov. 18, 2014

Long-term marijuana use on the brain A study published in The Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences last week has found that chronic—defined as three times per day over 10 years—marijuana users have a lower IQ score and smaller gray matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) region of the brain compared to non-users.… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Oct. 28, 2014

Physicists transport marbles with optical tractor beam The tractor beam—a long-distance invisible attraction beam—is a legendary staple in science fiction. In real life, moving objects using only light seems absurd, if not impossible. However, in a paper published in Nature Photonics, a team of Australian and American physicists successfully transferred glass marble ten centimetres using… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs—Oct. 21, 2014

Breakthrough in nuclear fission Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC), one of the world’s largest defence contractors—in 2009 it received 7.1 per cent of the Pentagon’s total funds—has had a major breakthrough in the study on the viability of shifting to nuclear energy. Led by Tom McGuire, the team demonstrated the feasibility of building a 100-megawatt reactor measuring… Keep Reading

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Research Briefs — Sept. 30

Face the truth: Mites found on human skin Microscopic eight-legged creatures make their homes in the faces of all people, a study recently published in PLOS ONE has shown. The Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sweat gland-dwelling species. Two different species of these mites reside on the face. The first, Demodex… Keep Reading

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