(Simon Poitrimolt / McGill Tribune)
(Simon Poitrimolt / McGill Tribune)

Student of the Week

a/Student Living/Student of the Week by

This student of the week was nominated for her active involvement within the McGill international development community. 

Q: Which Guinness World Record would you have the best shot at breaking?

A: The most chocolate consumed during finals.

Q: What’s your good luck charm?

A:  My watch. I wear [it] all the time, and if I leave the house without it on, I get a little paranoid. I start freaking out a little bit.

Q: If you were a club at McGill, which one would you be and why?

A: Though I’m not involved with them this year, [I would be] McGill Health. Maybe I’ll get involved next year [because] I feel like it’s important to have a balance and stay healthy. Keep a balance, so you can look back on these four years and not have the fifth floor of Schulich be the first thing that comes to mind.

Q: What reality TV show would you be perfect for?

A: “Secret Life of a Perfectionist.” I guess sometimes I have little mini-meltdowns, and in retrospect they’re always kind of funny. I feel like maybe people would get a little chuckle out of that; but at the time it’s pretty serious [to me].

Q: If you could be anywhere in the world right now instead of Montreal, where would it be?

A: Well I’m feeling a little homesick right now, so it would be nice to go back to Vancouver. But I am looking into doing an exchange next year, so I’m getting the whole Europe bug. Maybe England, [because] I have some family there.

Q: What’s your go-to stress-buster?

A: Calling up my parents, that’s a good one. They just put things in perspective.

Q: If you could only read one book for the rest of your life, what would it be?

A: There’s a really good book that I read: it’s by Mike McCardell—one of the Global TV news presenters. It’s called “Here’s Mike.” It’s just cute, he’ll be walking down the street and he’ll see a father and his daughter, and it’ll be something like the first time she’s riding a bike. He’ll write about [how] it’s just one of life’s little moments. It’s cheesy, but it’s a really happy book.

Q: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

A: Last year—first year—was really stressful with all the new work and stuff like that. And I know it’s not really the most profound advice, but I remember around midterms, I just didn’t go out or anything like that, and my dad said, “Go out! Stop studying! Take the night off and go have a beer.” It’s true though, you have to balance in general just taking the time to have fun and then being productive when you have to get some work done.

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d give McGill students?

A: An obvious one is balance. Get involved because coming out of first year you may feel like you’re in a groove, but there are always so many more opportunities. This year I’ve gotten a lot more involved, and I’ve met some great people.

Q: What’s one movie you’ll never watch again?

A: There was one called “Open Water.” It was about sharks. Just a waste of time. It was a lot of bobbing up and down in water, and it was just boring.

Q: Describe exam period in three words.

A: Oh my God. I think that would do it. Oh my God.

Q: What’s the first thing you think of when I say ‘Schulich’?

A: First year. Never again.

Q: What’s your biggest pet peeve?

A: When you open the door and a line of people come out, and don’t even acknowledge you. You’re just like “you’re welcome!” Personal doorman, that’s a big pet peeve.

Q: Who would star in the movie of your life?

A: Purely to boost my ego, but Zooey Deschanel is just so cute. She would be great; I would love to be portrayed by her.

Q: Why are you an asset to McGill?

A: I’m in a student network of economic development (SNED) and we get together and discuss foreign aid, micro-financing, and methods of economic development. I’m in international development, so that interests me a lot. It’s kind of important to get involved in clubs that pertain to what you’re studying, so you can get a more rounded out knowledge of [the subject]. To see how it’s practised so when you get out there you can see the opportunities where you can get involved. I’m [also] an intern at a local NGO. It’s not McGill but it’s all McGill volunteers and interns and stuff. It’s for the empowerment of female artisans in the developing world. It’s pretty new but I feel like I’m going to be involved with it for the next few years. Maybe not so much an asset to McGill per se, but maybe the community.