Jason Choi, Anatomy and Cell Biology, U1 (Alexandra Allaire / McGill Tribune)
Jason Choi, Anatomy and Cell Biology, U1 (Alexandra Allaire / McGill Tribune)

Student of the Week

a/Student Living/Student of the Week by

Q: What’s a typical Urban Groove rehearsal like?

A: It’s every Sunday, and it starts with a warm-up and stretch, and then a killer ab routine. This semester [we’re doing] something special [in rehearsal] called internal workshops. It’s where one member is selected each week to do a special workshop for everyone else. So we’ll have dancers who specialize in different styles like contemporary, Bollywood, tutting [a dance move mimicking King Tut], and popping, and they’ll do special workshops for that week. And then we just dance around.

Q: Is practice more rigorous when you’re getting ready for a show?

A: It gets more hectic. We tend to arrange more practices apart from the Sunday [ones]. It gets insane—every single day of the week we’ll have practices.

Q: What’s your favourite song to dance to?

A: I like dancing to songs that people would normally not dance to. Like the Tetris song. I’m really into ‘corneographies’ now; instead of choreography, it’s ‘corny-ography.’ You play around with the lyrics of the songs, and you use really corny songs like Taylor Swift songs, but then you….do really corny moves with the lyrics. Big dancers like Mike Song [choreographer for America’s Best Dance Crew and Step Up Revolution] and Anthony Lee [of World of Dance fame] are really….into corneography, and I’ve been watching them lately.

Q: What’s your signature dance move?

A: [It’s] not a dance move, but I think people know me for tutting. [My style is] an abstract form of tutting, where you make boxes with your hands. Popping is a genre of hip-hop. People know break dancing as the crazy flips and stuff, but popping is a more intricate style of hip-hop, where you get to play around with the music more. It’s [a] more lyrical movement. Tutting is [a sub-genre] within popping, where you just make cool shapes with your body.

Q: You’re also involved with World Vision. What’s your position with them?

A: I’m a volunteer coordinator, and my job is to recruit volunteers and find places to volunteer in the Montreal area.

Q: What kinds of events and fundraising do you guys do?

A: Last semester, we were volunteering at the [Montreal] Women’s Centre. They get a lot of donations from make-up companies and food companies, and our job is to sort out [clothing donations]. This semester, we’re going to volunteer at a homeless shelter in Atwater.

Q: The 30 Hour Famine was held last Friday and Saturday. Can you tell me about it?

A: Yeah, people do the 30 Hour Famine and they raise pledges for World Vision. It’s also an awareness thing, to  experience what [children in developing countries] experience. At the end of the 30 hours, we have a “breaking the fast” dinner, and that’s when we [raise] money from people who actually did the famine, and friends of [those] people. It’s a 10 dollar dinner, and that also raises money [for World Vision].

Q: What’s your secret talent?

A: I can twist balloons [into animals and shapes].

Q: What reality TV show are you perfect for?

A: K-Town. It’s like the Asian version of Jersey Shore. It’s in K-town, L.A.

Q: What’s the very first thing you would buy if you won the lottery?

A: Jeans. I have an obsession with denim.

Q: What’s the best reason to visit your hometown?

A: [My hometown is] Seoul, South Korea.  Good food, good people, nice subway system—and they have Wi-Fi everywhere.

Q: What’s the last song you remember listening to?

A: God’s Gift, by J. Cole.

Q: What’s your guilty pleasure?

A: Buying jeans.

Q: What word or phrase do you most overuse?

A: “My jeans.”

Q: If you could change one thing about Montreal, what would it be?

A: The slush. I don’t mind the [long] winter, just the slush. And the salt.

Q: Who would star in the movie of your life?

A: Childish Gambino.