Curiosity Delivers.

Science & Technology - page 62

The latest in science and technology.

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Stealing from the cookie jar

Your online accounts are vulnerable. From Amazon to Yahoo!, your personal information on many of your favourite sites, if used on a public network, can easily be stolen. Thanks to a Firefox plug-in called Firesheep, released last week by hacker Eric Butler, this risk is higher than ever. By installing the plug-in and connecting to… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Comparing the Dell XPS M1730 and HP Mini 210

Holly Stewart I own four computers. Call me a hoarder all you like, but I use all of them on a daily basis. I have two laptops for school and two LAMP servers in my room at home which I use for working on a network application. Having two laptops for daily use may seem… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Pseudoscience Symposium fills the aisles of Leacock 132

Adam Scotti James Randi fools students with electric beard trimmer. “You already have been fooled,” said James “The Amazing” Randi, a magician and pseudoscience investigator, in a lecture on Tuesday. “When I came out here, I took the microphone. I didn’t really need it. It simply is a beard trimmer.” He then proceded to shaved… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

New research shows video games may be addictive

Many people play video games as a temporary retreat from work or study, or to occasionally escape in the experience of traveling virtually to places and situations unlikely or impossible in the real world. According to recent studies by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto and by psychology researchers at Iowa… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

The greatest inventions of all time

freepatentsonline.com Sliced bread is awesome. But, if it’s truly one of the greatest inventions of all time, why do people still own bread knives? Here are some other suggestions for the top innovative inventions of all time. While these inventors may not have won  Nobel Prizes, they certainly deserve some recognition. 5.    The Printing Press… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Stuxnet: the world’s most sophisticated virus

    Stuxnet is a working and fearsome prototype of a cyber-weapon that will lead to the creation of a new arms race in the world Kaspersky Labs     When one of the world’s leading malware research labs releases a quote like this, it’s time to get worried. Stuxnet is one of the most advanced pieces… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Avoid iTunes’ high prices, legally

People love Apple, and a perfect example of this is the iPod. In order to use an iPod, one must have iTunes installed. If iTunes isn't installed, the iPod will not work. But when iTunes is installed, Apple's movie player, Quicktime, is also installed, as well as a number of other iServices that Apple doesn't tell you about.
Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

In Switzerland, accelerator begins smashing protons at full speed

At 12:58 p.m. local time last Tuesday, the Large Hadron Collider, a mammoth particle accelerator buried 100 metres beneath Geneva, Switzerland, finally began smashing subatomic particles together at record-high speeds. Though the LHC's first successful particle collisions occurred in November, on Tuesday physicists at the accelerator recorded the first collisions at the energy level - about seven trillion electron volts (TeV) - at which the collider will operate for about the next year and a half.
Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Up To Speed

The US National Cancer Institute team has found a way to manipulate immune cells in one's own body to attack certain kinds of cancer. Two of 17 people treated have been declared clear of skin cancer after treatment using genetically modified versions of their own immune cells.
Keep Reading

Placeholder
Science & Technology

Something in the Air

In this age of greenhouse gasses and smog advisories, air pollution has gotten a pretty bad name, and rightly so. But it still looks pretty trippy. Air pollution is divided into four categories: criteria air contaminates (which create smog and acid rain), persistent organic pollutants (which travel well and bioaccumulate in body tissues), heavy metals (which enter the food and water supply) and toxins (which will, in one way or another, kill you).
Keep Reading

Curiosity Delivers.
Go to Top