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Science & Technology

Why science students shouldn’t be afraid to write

For students in the Faculty of Science, the typical evaluation consists of a knowledge-based exam. Large class sizes, characteristic of first and second-year courses, often require evaluators to depend heavily on multiple choice questions. For better or for worse, this means that science students are rarely subjected to the torments of essay writing. In fact,… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Canada’s fentanyl crisis by the numbers

The scientific community describes the fentanyl crisis in these general words: Catastrophic and growing. Over the past decade, Canadian researchers have observed the deadly effects of the growing trend of cutting fentanyl into powdered party drugs. With the help of Edith Zorychta, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, The McGill Tribune set… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Microbead ban exposes the dangers of plastic pollution

The Canadian government has heard the cry of environmental activists and scientists. On Jan. 1, 2018, Health Canada enacted an official ban on the manufacturing and importation of products containing microbeads, following a written proposal for the regulation on June 2, 2017. A ban on the sales of these products is scheduled to take effect… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Five fun science electives that will satisfy your curiosity

Each semester, McGill students spend hours searching for courses that are both interesting and manageable. For those who are not enrolled in a Science major and are feeling particularly adventurous this semester, The McGill Tribune has compiled a list of five fascinating electives that are sure to pique your interest. CHEM 181 – World of Chemistry:… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Bomb cyclone rings in the New Year

On Jan. 4, 2018, much of the American and Canadian East Coasts were hit with chilling temperatures, snowy conditions, and hurricane-force winds. Iguanas fell from trees in Florida, Boston’s streets flooded with icy water, and parts of New Brunswick saw more than 50 centimetres of snow. The culprit was a “bomb cyclone” named Winter Storm… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

The indestructible deconstructed

A group of McGill scientists were recognized for their cutting-edge research, an example of innovation at its finest. “Innovations are the solutions that no one else would think of,” Don Sheppard, professor of microbiology and immunology and researcher, told The McGill Tribune. Québec Science Magazine recently recognized Sheppard and his team for their revolutionary work on… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Breastfed babies are less likely to develop eczema

Since the 1950s, breastfeeding has been almost a taboo subject in the United States and Canada. A simple Google search of “breastfeeding” shows top news stories of women being shamed by strangers for breastfeeding in public. This negative response might help explain the low rates of breastfeeding in many developed countries. In the United States,… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Studying bird speech patterns can explain universal grammar rules

In the 1960s, Noam Chomsky, a linguist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, observed that different languages across the world have common patterns. Chomsky postulated the Theory of Universal Grammar (UG), which suggests that humans have created languages and grammar rules that conveniently fit with how our brain is organized. McGill PhD student Logan Smith… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Distinguishing science from sci-fi in the search for extraterrestrials

Astrobiology, the scientific study of life beyond Earth, was born in 1959 and pioneered by NASA’s Ames Research Center. Along with scientific research, public imagination of extraterrestrial life was broadening. In 1969, when Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins successfully landed on the moon, it reached new heights. Since 1947, when in Roswell, New… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

Brain circuit connectivity directly affects how much we like music

Humans are on the lookout for rewarding stimuli all the time. Our ability to experience pleasure from some of these stimuli is an evolutionary mechanism to ensure the pursuit of basic biological needs, such as eating, known as primary rewards. However, humans also have the capacity to experience pleasure from types of stimuli that have… Keep Reading

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