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The latest in science and technology.

Project Glass makes wearable computing a future reality. (digitaltrends.com)
Science & Technology

Wearable computing at a glance

Imagine window-shopping down Ste. Catherine on a crisp Sunday morning, when a stunning suit on display catches your eye. Beep! Brand: Arrow; Size: M; Price: $700—all this information pops up in front of your eyes in the flash of a second. This is the future of shopping, as Google envisions it, by introducing Glass. Glass… Keep Reading

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Science & Technology

Quantum computers: science fiction brought to life

Constructing the fastest computer has always been a huge challenge posed by technology. In the past, computer developments werheld back, as the machines, though extremely fast, could only perform one binary operation at a time. Today, this is no longer true. In May 2011, computing company D-Wave released the first commercial quantum computers, which run… Keep Reading

Online brain games may prevent cognitive degeneration. (mindblogs.smartandstrong.com)
Science & Technology

Newborn computer games prevent elderly dementia

The feeling of hitting your maximum capacity to remember facts is not a foreign concept to students—especially the night before an exam. Fortunately, one’s cognitive reserve is far from rigid. Recent research has shown that keeping your cognitive faculties active may be instrumental in preventing the age-related neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in every 11… Keep Reading

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Science & Technology

Promising solution for those with poor taste

For people without a functional salivary gland, food tastes like it is rolled in sand, says Dr. Simon Tran, Faculty of Dentistry and Canada Research Chair in Craniofacial Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering. Based on a recent paper by Vijayendra Kumar for the Indian Journal of Stomatology, up to 1.5 litres of saliva is produced… Keep Reading

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Science & Technology

Why You Should Eat More Curry

What exactly is Alzheimer’s? Often referred to as “Old timer’s disease,” Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that affects nearly 36 million people worldwide. It causes problems with memory, thinking and behaviour, and is classified as a progressive illness, which means that symptoms will gradually worsen over time. Whereas someone with early stage Alzheimer’s might… Keep Reading

Waves of gene expressions in wild and mutated zebrafish embryos from François’ recent paper. (www.sciencedirect.com)
Science & Technology

Ideas spark at interface of physics, biology

Humming away in the Rutherford Physics building, a long cold walk from Stewart Bio, is a computer that can predict one of the fundamental processes in biology: how vertebrae form. Paul François, associate professor in the department of physics, and associate member of the department of biology, is one researcher applying physics to biology problems.… Keep Reading

A full house at the debate. (Elizabeth Flannery / McGill Tribune)
Science & Technology

Debate pits Science against Homeopathy

On Nov. 27, in a crowded Leacock 132 auditorium, McGill’s Office of Science and Society (OSS) hosted its second debate on naturopathy, titled “Homeopathy: Mere placebo or great medicine?” The debate pitted Dr. Joe Schwarcz, professor of chemistry and director of the OSS, against Dr. André Saine, a practicing naturopath doctor specializing in homeopathy and… Keep Reading

Science & Technology

This Week in Research

  Vitamin D and cancer Vitamin D is correlated with many health benefits, including lower cancer risk; but until now, the link has always been unclear. McGill researchers have uncovered a piece of the puzzle, explaining how the vitamin may help to prevent cancer. In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National… Keep Reading

Giant marine sponge in the South Pacific. (marinesciencetoday.com)
Science & Technology

Ocean may yield cystic fibrosis treatment

The Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre at McGill University and the University of British Columbia are looking in unexpected places for potential cures—under the sea. Dr. David Thomas, Chair of McGill’s department of biochemistry and Canada Research chair in molecular genetics, focuses his research on investigating quality control of proteins. The researchers have discovered a… Keep Reading

Photo credit: (cigarettes-cigarettes.com)
Science & Technology

Taking a broader view of nicotine addiction

Over the past 20 years, scientists have completed hundreds of studies on the adverse effects of nicotine consumption—especially from cigarette usage. However, the progress made in lowering the fatalities and costs from the drug has been disappointing, given the amount of money put into these studies. Approximately 37,000 deaths and $4.4 billion in hospital fees… Keep Reading

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