Curiosity Delivers.

Features - page 9

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Memories unravelled

In 1953, Henry Molaison underwent an experimental surgery known as bilateral temporal lobectomy to treat the severe epilepsy he had been experiencing. His surgeon removed his medial temporal lobe, including a structure known as the hippocampus—a part of the brain involved in the storage of long-term memory—in hopes of curing the condition. While Molaison emerged… Keep Reading

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Split identities

Despite differences in healthcare, politics, and even serving sizes, Canada and the United States have a lot in common. They share a continent, many aspects of culture, and—thanks to strong flows of product and people—citizens. As a Canadian university that attracts a large influx of  American students every year, McGill has a substantial population of… Keep Reading

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Evolving our foundations

It is hard to ignore the eclectic style of McGill’s buildings. Whether it is the imposing limestone pillars that adorn the Arts Building or the clean-cut, grille-like exterior of Leacock, McGill boasts incredible architectural diversity. Keep Reading

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Campus stories

In August, the Tribune met with nine different students, who will each go through a year’s worth of experiences in Montreal. Each was asked to describe something important to him or her. In April, we will revisit their stories. Eric Mitchell, U2 Faculty of Science, neuroscience Describe something important to you right now. What’s really important to… Keep Reading

Redpath Museum at McGill
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The Many Faces of the Redpath Museum

It isn’t often that a museum exhibit gets to stare back at its visitors. But for the past year, those who have climbed to the third floor of the Redpath Museum have been able to lock eyes with three unexpectedly youthful new faces—model reconstructions of what the museum’s 2000-year-old Egyptian mummies might have looked like centuries… Keep Reading

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Game of phones: Tinder

Swipe right, swipe left. This isn’t Mr. Miyagi’s new mantra in the latest Karate Kid sequel, but if you’ve used the mobile app Tinder, it may resonate with you as a mantra of sorts. Perhaps you’ve opened up Tinder on your phone before, only to realize 10 minutes later that you’ve slipped into a hypnotic,… Keep Reading

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Incubating innovation: a university’s role in fostering social entrepreneurship

Canada’s social economy is replete with innovators inspired by a global consciousness that transforms oppression into opportunity. It is a sector that is neither publicly nor privately controlled and touts one of the fastest growth rates in the country. According to Statistics Canada, non-profit industries contributed $35.6 billion to the national economy in 2007, exceeding… Keep Reading

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The curious case of Busty and the Bass

The searching notes of a saxophone float over the bar’s quiet murmur,  cutting across open bottles and muted conversations. A drum line slips between the notes, riding the low strums of the bass playing alongside it. Trumpets, trombone, guitar, and the sweet shiver of keys all gradually fold themselves into the music. It’s the rare… Keep Reading

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