Curiosity Delivers.

Cannabis as a key for chronic illness

Since the legalization of cannabinoids—chemical compounds found in cannabis—for medical purposes in 2001, a growing number of Canadian physicians have turned to medicinal marijuana for patients suffering from cancer and other chronic disorders such as multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Cannabinoid receptors, which bind cannabinoids, influence cognitive and physiological processes and are part of a larger… Keep Reading

United Nations stresses climate conundrum

It was a mild morning in London, England when the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its groundbreaking report in May 1990. By proclaiming that the Earth’s gradual warming is unquestionably man-made, it became the first international body to state so. The report was concise: “Unless emissions of carbon dioxide and other… Keep Reading

Which came first: The chicken or the dinosaur?

At first glance, a chicken and a dinosaur may seem as distantly related as any two species could be. For Hans Larsson, McGill associate professor of paleontology and biology and director of the Redpath Museum, the correlation between the two could not be clearer. In his presentation on Sept. 14, “Freaky Friday: Weird things I… Keep Reading

Eager volunteers take to the web in search of spiders

A recent McGill study following the distribution patterns of the northern black widow and black purse-web spider populations hints at what the future of biodiversity research may look like in the digital age. Using previously collected observations from public online databases, McGill researchers have joined the increasing number of academics who harness the power of… Keep Reading

A story of community: Trees, fungi, and microbes work hand-in-hand

Researchers at McGill, in partnership with the Université de Montréal’s (UdeM) Plant Biology Research Institute, have discovered a hidden ecosystem that works to clean polluted land. The project consisted of a collaboration between Nicholas Brereton, a research fellow at UdeM’s Plant Biology Research Institute and senior author of the study, and Emmanuel Gonzalez, a bioinformatics… Keep Reading

Five science documentaries to binge this Reading Week

Reading week has finally arrived. For many eager students, this well-deserved break only moves their academic pursuits from the lecture halls and libraries to the comfort of their own homes. While the semesterly grind may leave students feeling bogged-down and stressed-out, kicking back and relaxing with a good documentary, in place of a textbook, is… Keep Reading

Inspiring the aspiring: AsapSCIENCE at SUS Academia Week

The dynamic and informative SUS Academia Week, which ran this year from Feb. 5 to Feb. 9, came to an enlightening conclusion on Friday night. Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown, self-proclaimed ‘science communicators’ and creators of the popular science YouTube channel AsapSCIENCE, presented this year’s keynote lecture, “Into the Future with AsapSCIENCE.” With over seven… Keep Reading

Can vitamin C really cure the common cold?

It’s that time of the year again. Flu season is upon us, and everyone seems to be getting sick. Most people resort to their personal catalogue of remedies and preventive strategies to avoid the winter plague—among them, reaching for a bottle of ascorbic acid, or vitamin C. The theory that vitamin C could prevent the… Keep Reading

Canada’s fentanyl crisis by the numbers

The scientific community describes the fentanyl crisis in these general words: Catastrophic and growing. Over the past decade, Canadian researchers have observed the deadly effects of the growing trend of cutting fentanyl into powdered party drugs. With the help of Edith Zorychta, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, The McGill Tribune set… Keep Reading

Curiosity Delivers.
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