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Book Review – Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun

A.J. Somerset blends a barrell full of personal anecdotes with historical analysis in Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun to explore the rise of gun culture in North America.  Somerset, a former Canadian soldier and avid sport shooter, offers a unique perspective into how and why guns have morphed from a tool of war,… Keep Reading

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Ladies’ Book Night provides brutal honesty among hilarity

Librarie Drawn and Quarterly, a snug little bookstore in the Plateau, welcomed four American writers—Mira Gonzalez, Elizabeth Ellen, Chloe Caldwell, and Chelsea Marti—to present their monotone yet dynamically comic collections in spoken word. The synergetic flow between the four writers is astounding, yet makes perfect sense. All four women write poetry, novellas, short stories, and… Keep Reading

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Lena Dunham’s new book offers insights, few surprises

Fans of Girls will rejoice that Lena Dunham’s recently published book, Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s “Learned,” offers readers the same self-deprecating humour, laugh-out-loud one liners, and stories almost too erratic to be true that made its author’s popular HBO show a megahit. The book is marketed as… Keep Reading

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Wilt the Stilt walks again

A collective of writers and artists known as “FreeDarko” rose to cult Internet fame with their essays promoting the concept of “liberated fandom” that is the idea that the modern basketball fan didn’t need to restrict him or herself to a single franchise but could, instead, enjoy the wide array of individuals that made up… Keep Reading

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Animals go feral in Sedaris’s latest

There’s a clear reason why Ian Falconer, who illustrated David Sedaris’s latest book, Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary, only uses shades of red and black in his illustrations.  It’s because the stories, which tersely detail single events in the lives of animals, are often bloody and bleak. But it’s also a matter of economy.… Keep Reading

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Definitely decaf

The Lost Art of Gratitude is the literary equivalent of a warm cup of tea: it’s calming, unhurried, and a welcome escape. The plot meanders like a lazy river, driven by characters rather than action. The book is the sixth in the Sunday Philosophy Club series by Scottish author Alexander McCall Smith, best known for… Keep Reading

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Finding sanctuary in the written word

Jane Urquhart was born a writer, but she never envisioned that she would one day be considered among the ranks of the most widely read and respected Canadian authors. With the recent publication of her seventh novel, Sanctuary Line, Urquhart has been nominated  for the prestigious Giller Prize: an award honouring the author of an… Keep Reading

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Nancy Drew’s newest competition

When Alan Bradley set out to write his first detective novel he had no idea it would lead to the character of Flavia de Luce, or to a series about the young sleuth, in which The Weed that Strings the Hangman's Bag is the second novel. "I was writing another detective novel that I thought I had plotted very carefully for story and characters, then Flavia just materialized in it," Bradley says.
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