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Arts & Entertainment

From the Viewpoint: The resilient whimsy of stop motion animation

This spring, to the beat of drums and the barks of strays, Wes Anderson released his second animated film, Isle of Dogs, nine years after his first, Fantastic Mr. Fox. Both are personal favourites of mine, and  both use the century-old technique of stop motion animation. Though I enjoyed both films immensely, I knew nothing of the laborious technique behind their distinct aesthetic, so The McGill Tribune sent me to the community focused Festival Stop Motion Montreal. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

‘Resplendent Illuminations’ showcases centuries old opulence

Softly lit walls and echoes of medieval chamber music provide the backdrop for a history-buff’s dream-come-true in the Montreal Museum of Fine Art (MMFA)’s current exhibition, Resplendent Illuminations. The show, which runs until Jan. 6, exhibits the work of centuries-old craftsmen in a sizable collection of books of hours.   Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Birds Crossing Borders bridges the gap between Syrian and Canadian communities

Since 2017, over 6,100 refugees have arrived in Montreal. With her multimedia exhibition, Khadja Baker puts a name, face, and voice to six of these individuals with her captivating and powerful audio-visual installation, Birds Crossing Borders, which premiered on Sept. 13 at the theatre and gallery, Montreal Arts Interculturelle. A Kurdish-Syrian who witnessed the Syrian civil war firsthand, with family members who left unable to cross borders, Baker presents a collection of stories from Syrian refugees living in Montreal to chip away at the myth of refugees as radical extremists. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Stuff we liked this summer

Summer 2018 saw no shortage of consumable content. But while some plebs may have been watching Netflix rom-com To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before on repeat, or blasting Drake’s Scorpion, the A&E team had their ears to the ground. Here’s some stuff for your ears and eyes that we found especially cool. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

My search for the best joke at Just for Laughs

On my third day at this year’s Just for Laughs festival, Irish comedian Dylan Moran said something that piqued my interest. Moran had just told a joke about time—comparing it to a French waiter, since it’s never around until it comes and cleans up—and tagged it with a proclamation that it was the best joke at the festival. Spoiler alert: it wasn’t. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Ivytide launches musical career of McGill students

For Nathan Gagné, U2 Psychology, vocalist and rhythm guitarist for Ivytide, an indie rock/R&B fusion group, making a living through music would be the perfect scenario. “The school thing is a backup to [being a musician],” Gagné said. “If I’m able to...sustain myself by making music, that would be the dream.” Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Posters, drugs & rock n’ roll

Professor and curator Marc H. Choko’s exhibition, Nonconforming Poster Designers, displayed at the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQÀM) Center of Design, is a psychedelic trip without the kool-aid. The show explores the work of two classically trained designers, Elzo Durt and Sebastien Lepine, and their experimental techniques and kaleidoscopic visual effects. Durt and Lepine disregard traditional boundaries of line, form, and color in a series of silk screen printed posters reminiscent of a visual hybrid, somewhere between the Merry Prankster’s day-glo bus paintings, and the meticulous detailing of a 17th century woodcut engraving. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

High as Hope reveals a grown-up Florence

Eccentric, electric, and extraordinary, Florence Welch and her devoted Machine defied conventions with their June 29 release of High as Hope. The band’s fourth album reveals a seasoned, contemplative Welch who explains her past traumas in music for the first time. Florence + The Machine’s first three albums, Lungs, Ceremonials, and How Big, How Blue,… Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

The Now Now marks the end of an era

The Now Now dropped on June 29, a little over a year after the 2017 release of Humanz—a genre-defying, guest star-studded smorgasbord of an album. The Now Now features only three musical cameos, choosing instead to privilege Damon Albarn’s voice, revealing an interiority previously unexplored on Gorillaz albums. In “Fire Flies,” Albarn sifts through meditations on… Keep Reading

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