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Arts & Entertainment

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Arts & Entertainment

What we watched this winter break

Arriving home for winter break in the typical post-exam fugue tends to make the inevitable holiday burnout all the more severe. Everyone knows that those few weeks between semesters are best spent binge-watching movies in sweatpants and resisting the urge to hit refresh on MyCourses—at least that’s how we in the Arts & Entertainment section… Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

The comedy of “Vice” lies in its absurd truth

In a moment when Trump’s presidency is often perceived as a low point in American democracy, Adam McKay’s Vice shows how Trump is simply following in the footsteps of older, more tactful Republicans predecessors. Christian Bale depicts Dick Cheney with undisguised bias as a man of pure evil, even thanking Satan at the Golden Globes for… Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Oh, What a Show: Kacey Musgraves radiates at Mtelus

“Born in a hurry, always late, haven’t been early since ’88,” is one of the best and most endearing opening lines for an album. It is infinitely more compelling when sung by a shimmering silhouette emerging from a shroud of fog. From those opening words to the last glimmering chords of “High Horse,” Kacey Musgraves’… Keep Reading

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The best and worst of 2018

Best Albums: 1. Be the Cowboy, Mitski Sad indie kids have traded their beanies for cowboy hats, wallowing in perhaps the most beautiful auditory manifestation of sadness to ever have graced the radio waves. Hive Mind, The Internet   2. Hive Mind, The Internet This summer, the Internet brought the world an R&B collection of… Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Yvette Nolan’s ‘The Birds’ places indigeneity in the spotlight

Yvette Nolan’s adaptation of Aristophanes’s classic Greek comedy The Birds, which ran Nov. 21-23 and 28-30 at Moyse Hall Theatre, focuses on the history of colonization, and the future of truth and reconciliation for indigenous peoples in Canada. Produced as a part of the English department’s Drama & Theatre Program, The Birds features student actors and crew… Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

‘Hyper Real’ thoughtfully reflects race relations

Hyper Real, which showed at Concordia University’s student art gallery, VAV (Visual Arts Visuels,) until Nov. 30, showcased the work of nine black artists, juxtaposing themes like masculinity and femininity and isolation and connection, in a series of video art works, graphic prints and eerily arranged baby-doll sculptures. The exhibition functioned as a mirror, reflecting the identities and personal narratives of the artists, but also provided viewers with a space to examine their own perceptions of black identity and race relations. While the works varied in form, each deconstructed stereotypical beliefs in an exhibition that was at once introspective and expressive. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Aladdin remake returns to disappointing tropes

In the wake of widespread excitement for a live-action version of Lion King, Disney has been teasing the release of Guy Ritchie’s remake of Aladdin throughout the fall. Set to be released in May 2019, the film will bring to life the world of Agrabah, a faraway land of childhood dreams. As a child, the animated version of Aladdin (1992) was my first glimpse at cartoon characters that looked something like me and my family. At the time, I was overwhelmed to see a movie that depicted an Arab story, not yet aware of the movie’s many historical and cultural inaccuracies. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Grimes said “We Appreciate Power,” so now we appreciate power

The rise of artificial Intelligence (A.I.) has been decried by the likes of many — after all, there are few things more terrifying than that. Not exactly so: According to Grimes' newest track, “We Appreciate Power,” this dystopia could actually be pretty cool. The Canadian pop princess declared the A.I. invasion to be good, therefore, it is gospel. Keep Reading

Arts & Entertainment

Arcadia delves into discussions of science, sexuality, and existentialism

Past and present overlap in playwright Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, a curious exploration of sex and love, mathematics and nature, and the pursuit of knowledge. Presented by Player’s Theatre and directed by Steven Greenwood (PhD candidate in English), Arcadia portrays the curiosity and determination of young scholars in this brilliant rendition of Stoppard’s 1993 tragicomedy. Arcadia is set in two… Keep Reading

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